Tag Archives: Green Lantern

For Your Consideration: Hugo Award Graphic Story

The deadline for nominating works for the Hugo Awards is March 10, 2013. Members (as of January 31, 2013) of Chicon 7, LoneStarCon 3, or Loncon 3 are eligible to nominate.

One of the troubles with the Graphic Story category is that much of what’s published is in a highly serialized form, with storylines sometimes extending over more than a year. Publishers typically gather six to ten issues into trade editions, and these are what get nominated. But in reality, these volumes often don’t represent entire, self-contained stories.

In my opinion, the graphic story category remains the strongest overall category on the Hugo ballot. Choosing five nominees is an almost impossible task because there are so many good choices to pick from. Yet, the Hugo voters consistently nominate the same fanish works year after year. Come on, folks, there is more than Girl Genius and Schlock Mercenary. Much more.

The comics world is producing more top-notch work than in any other Hugo category, yet only seven works made the 5% cutoff last year (nine, if you count two works with 4.94% each). The number of graphic stories that are published is staggering, so I challenge the Hugo voters to think carefully about your choices and to not just fill in your ballots with last year’s nominees because you can’t think of anything else. Don’t be afraid to nominate superhero stories; these are some of the most exciting and relevant science fiction tales being published.

For your consideration:

  • The Abominable Charles Christopher, Karl Kerschl (http://karlkerschl.com)AdventureTime_v1
  • Adventure Time, Vol. 1, Ryan North, Shelli Paroline, Branden Lamb (BOOM! Studios)
  • American Vampire, Vol. 4, Scott Snyder, Rafael Albuquerque (Vertigo)
  • Aquaman, Vol. 1, Geoff Johns, Ivan Reis, Joe Prado (DC)
  • Batman: Earth One, Geoff Johns, Gary Frank (DC)batman-court-of-owls
  • Batman: The Court of Owls, Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo (DC)
  • The Battle of Blood and Ink: A Fable of the Flying City, Jared Axelrod, Steve Walker (Tor)
  • Battlepug, Mike Norton (http://www.battlepug.com)
  • Batwoman, Vol. 1, J.H. Williams III, W. Haden Blackman (DC)
  • Chew, Vol. 6: Space Cakes, John Layman, Rob Guillory (Image)
  • Cinderella: Fables are Forever, Chris Roberson, Shawn McManus (Vertigo)
  • Daredevil, Vol. 1, Mark Waid, Chris Samnee (Marvel)dial-h
  • Dial H, Vol. 1: Into You, China Miéville, Mateus Santolouco (DC)
  • Earth 2, Vol. 1, James Robinson, Nicola Scott (DC)
  • Fables, Vol. 17: Inherit the Wind, Bill Willingham, et al (Vertigo)
  • Frankenstein Alive, Alive!, Steve Niles, Bernie Wrightson (IDW)
  • Grandville Bete Noir, Bryan Talbot (Dark Horse)
  • Hawkeye, Vol. 1, Matt Fraction, David Aja, Javier Pulido (Marvel)irredeemable
  • Irredeemable, Vol. 10, Mark Waid, Diego Barreto (BOOM! Studios)
  • iZombie, Vol. 4: Repossessed, Chris Roberson, Mike Allred (DC)
  • Justice League, Vol. 1, Geoff Johns, Jim Lee (DC)
  • Lobster Johnson Vol. 2: The Burning Hand, Mike Mignola, John Arcudi, Scott Allie, Tonci Zonjic (Dark Horse)
  • Locke & Key: Clockworks, Joe Hill, Gabriel Rodriguez (IDW)manhattan-projects
  • The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1, Jonathan Hickman, Nick Pitavro (Image)
  • Mind MGMT, Matt Kindt (Dark Horse)20thCenturyBoys22
  • Naoki Urasawa’s 20th Century Boys, Vol. 22, Naoki Urasawa (VIZ Media)
  • The New Deadwardians, Dan Abnett, I.N.J. Culbard (Vertigo)
  • Peter Panzerfaust, Vol. 1: The Great Escape, Kurtis Wiebe, Tyler Jenkins (Image)
  • Prophet, Vol. 1: Remission, SImon Roy, Farel Dalrymple, Giannis Milogiannis, Brandon Graham (Image)
  • Punk Rock Jesus, Sean Murphy (Vertigo)saga
  • Saga, Vol. 1, Brian K. Vaughn, Fiona Staples (Image)
  • Sailor Twain: Or: The Mermaid in the Hudson, Mark Siegel (First Second)
  • Saucer Country, Vol. 1: Run, Paul Cornell, Ryan Kelly (Vertigo)
  • The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, Vol. 1, Tradd Moore, Justin Jordan (Image)
  • Superman: Earth One, Vol. 2, J. Michael Straczynski, Shane Davis (DC)
  • The Underwater Welder, Jeff Lemire (Top Shelf)the-unwritten-6
  • The Unwritten, Volume 6: Tommy Taylor and the War of Words, Mike Carey, Peter Gross (Vertigo)
  • The Walking Dead, Vol. 16: A Larger World, Robert Kirkman, Charlie Allard (Image)
  • Wonder Woman, Vol. 1, Brian Azzarello, Tony Akins (DC)wrinkle-in-time-graphic-novel
  • A Wrinkle in Time, adapted by Hope Larson (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

WonderCon 2012, Part 2

Arno Axolotl gets skewered in support of HBO's Game of Thrones.

TV

There were a number of panels relating to TV programs. Prime-time series Person of Interest, Alcatraz, Once Upon a Time, and Community all had well attended presentations. Since WonderCon came before the Fall schedule was announced, there were few new shows in evidence. I didn’t see it, but I think there were some teasers from the new Arrow program that is replacing Smallville.

There were several panels devoted to TV animation. I was unable to get into the Adventure Time panel, the only presentation I missed due to the room being full. I did see the DC Nation panel that previewed clips from Green Lantern: The Animated Series and the second season of Young Justice, as well as some of the short-shorts that they are playing on Saturday mornings. Unfortunately, there was no real mention of the new Batman series or any other possible offerings that may be in development.

Alcatraz panel with stars Jorge Garcia, Sarah Jones, Parminder Nagra, Jonny Coyne, and Robert Forster, plus some of the writers and producers.

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Movies

One of the more fun panels during the convention was a retrospective of the movies from 1982. With such science fiction and fantasy classics as Star Trek II, Blade Runner, E.T., Tron, Poltergeist, Conan, and The Thing, not to mention cult classics like Megaforce, the panelists had a good time reminiscing and joking about their favorites.

Damon Lindelof and Ridley Scott discuss Prometheus

There were a number of previews for this summer’s blockbusters. Ridley Scott and Damon Lindelof were there in person to introduce the latest trailer for Prometheus. I still don’t really know what the movie will be like, but I expect an intelligent, thrilling adventure.

One of the highlights was the trailer for Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Produced by Tim Burton and directed by Timur Bekmambetov, this looks to be a wild and exciting movie. Who knew Lincoln was such a bad-ass vampire killer!

Other previews included Battleship, which doesn’t look quite as lame as the first trailer made it look, but think it’s basically Transformers in sheep’s clothing—lots of explosions, but nonsensical. The preview for Snow White and the Huntsman looked interesting—certainly Snow White herself should be a strong female lead.

The weirdest preview was for a film called Sound of My Voice. They showed the first ten minutes of the film that introduced us to a cult based on a charismatic female time traveler (or perhaps a charismatic con artist). After the clip, two supposed members of the cult came on stage in a piece of performance art that I don’t think was well received. Finally, writer/director Zal Batmanglij and writer/lead actor Brit Marling came out to expound on the film a little. It is an ultra low-budget independent film that has been shown on the festival circuit to reasonable success. The film will be widely released in late April. I’m not sure I was wholly convinced to seek it out.

Rounding out the movie previews was a screening of the next DC animated film, Superman vs. The Elite, which comes out in June. I will have a full review later; the snapshot is that this is quite good. DC Animation consistently comes up with good to excellent features, something their live-action counterparts do not. They also teased Batman: The Dark Knight Returns with some short clips. It looked awesome. (Rumors are that the story will be split into two parts, which if true is a good sign that it will not be compromised from the graphic novel by Frank Miller.)

Justice League: Doom

Justice League: Doom (2012)
Written by Dwayne McDuffie, based on “Tower of Babel” by Mark Waid; directed by Lauren Montgomery

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Snapshot: An exciting adventure reuniting most of the creative talent from the Justice League animated TV series that is almost derailed by major plot holes at the end.

Major spoilers ahead!

The story opens with Batman (Kevin Conroy), Superman (Tim Daly), Wonder Woman (Susan Eisenberg), Green Lantern (Nathan Fillion) Martian Manhunter (Carl Lumbly), and the Flash (Michael Rosenbaum) thwarting a jewel heist by a gang of thieves who seem to have a little more high-tech than expected. It turns out that they were supplied by the immortal Vandal Savage (Phil Morris) as part of his plot to destroy the Justice League and take over the world.

It turns out Savage is focused on the big picture. Little things like Batman’s secret identity don’t interest him (and anyway, he already knows it). Savage uses his “Legion of Doom” to discover and carry out the Dark Knight’s “contingency plans” for stopping any rogue Justice League member. This leads to a second act filled with nonstop action and suspense as the Justice Leaguers are knocked off, one by one by their rivals: Bane (Carlos Alazraqui), Cheetah (Claudia Black), Metallo (Paul Blackthorne), Star Sapphire (Olivia d’Abo), Mirror Master (Alexis Denisof), and Ma’alefa’ak (Carl Lumbly).

The third act is also filled with exciting action as the League regroups and fights to stave off Savage’s ultimate end game: the literal destruction of half the world’s population along with all technology utilizing electricity so that he can become the undisputed ruler of what’s left. Here’s where, for me, the plot goes off the rails. I realize that movies like this have to up the ante, especially with superheroes as powerful as the Justice League, but really, what kind of crazy does a super-villain have to be to think that ruling a decimated Earth would be any way fulfilling?

And the way Savage plans to wreak this havoc is mind-boggling, even for a comic book story. OK, he demonstrated that he has super-advanced technology earlier in the story, so I can kind of give it a pass that he can launch a rocket from the Earth that will crash into the Sun causing massive solar flares that will destroy anything in their path. But come one, it’s the fracking Sun! There’s nothing manmade that could possibly cause the Sun to explode this way.

If this were the only plot hole, I could forgive it. But the bigger plot hole is that the rocket takes only about a minute to reach the Sun. Even at the speed of light, it would take eight minutes, a fact that they repeat several times in relation to how long it will take the solar flares to reach Earth. A rocket would take months, if not years (it took the MESSENGER probe almost four years to arrive at Mercury) to reach the Sun. This could have been easily explained away in the movie if Savage had simply stated that he launched the rocket months ago in preparation. The climax could still have been as exciting, with the heroes attempting to activate the rocket’s fail-safe rather than attempting to cancel its launch.

Nevertheless, Justice League: Doom is well worth seeing. The chemistry between the returning voice actors is fun, as the they have grown into their roles over the years. Bumper Robinson as Cyborg is a welcome addition to the ensemble, and I hope we get to see more of him in future installments. (This movie just reinforces my desire to see a resurrected Justice League TV series.) There are many nice character interactions between the heroes and their villainous counterparts, as well as some pointed humor between Batman and Alfred (“You’re dripping blood on my clean floor.”) There is also some wonderful poignancy in the second act when it looks like our heroes are done for, especially when Green Lantern thinks he’s killed a civilian and momentarily loses his nerve.

Justice League: Doom is an exciting yet bittersweet end to Dwayne McDuffie’s prolific career as a writer for the DC animated universe (he died unexpectedly a year ago). I wish that the live-action movies were even close to the quality of the animated movies.

For Your Consideration: Hugo Award Graphic Story

The deadline for nominating works for the Hugo Awards is March 11, 2012. Members (as of January 31, 2012) of Renovation, Chicon 7, or LoneStarCon 3 are eligible to nominate. For the Graphic Story category, I have compiled a list of works that could be considered.

It is clear that Hugo readers are not avid comic book readers. There is little overlap of the Hugo nominees and any of the comics-related best-of lists and awards. The Hugo voters are going for fanish titles such as Girl Genius and Schlock Mercenary, along with obscure titles by fan-favorite writers such as Paul Cornell and Joss Whedon, and ignoring outstanding mainstream titles such as The Walking Dead, Locke & Key, Chew, 20th Century Boys, Return of the Dapper Men, and Irredeemable, to name a few. Yes, Y: The Last Man, Fables, and The Unwritten have been nominated, but there’s so much more good stuff not being recognized.

One of the troubles with this category is that much of what’s published is in a highly serialized form, with storylines sometimes extending over more than a year. Publishers typically gather six to ten issues into trade editions, and these are what get nominated. But in reality, these volumes don’t often represent entire, self-contained stories. How can one justify recognizing an incomplete story?

The comics world is producing more top-notch work than in any other Hugo category, yet only seven works made the 5% cutoff last year. Moreover, the Hugo voters have given the award to Girl Genius three years in a row. To his credit, Phil Foglio announced that he would not accept a nomination this year for Girl Genius. It remains to be seen whether this will be enough to convince this year’s Business Meeting to permanently ratify the Graphic Story category. As much of a comics fan as I am, if there is no greater diversity of nominees, I may have to support ending the category. Although the Hugo Award is a popularity contest, it should ideally represent a broad representation of the best of science fiction and fantasy.

The number of graphic stories that are published is staggering. I’ve tried to narrow down my list to titles that I’ve seen favorably reviewed. Nevertheless, I suspect I’ve missed worthy books. Most of the entries on the list are printed. I’m not a connoisseur of web comics, but I know there are some good ones being published. Even so, for a lot of web comics it’s hard to tell where stories start and stop and therefore what is eligible in a calendar year. Check with a site like Top Web Comics for a list of possibilities.

I’ve highlighted a few titles that have appeared on multiple best-of lists or that I have personal knowledge of being excellent. I challenge the Hugo nominators to think carefully about their choices and to not just fill in their ballots with last year’s nominees because you can’t think of anything else.

For your consideration:

Abominable Charles Christopher, Book One by Karl Kerschl

Amulet #4: The Last Council by Kazu Kibuishi

Angel: After the Fall, Vol. 4 by Joss Whedon and Brian Lynch

Anita Blake: Circus of the Damned: The Ingenue by Laurell K. Hamilton, Jessica Booth, and Ron Lim

Anya’s Ghost by Vera Brosgol

B.P.R.D.: Being Human by Mike Mignola, et al.

Batman & Robin, Vol. 2: Batman vs. Robin by Grant Morrison, et al.

Batman: Eye of the Beholder by Tony Daniel

Batman: Noel by Lee Bermejo

Batman: The Black Mirror by Scott Snyder, Jock, and Francesco Francavilla

The Bean, Vol. 1: Riddles & Shrooms by Travis Hanson

The Boys, Vol. 9: The Big Ride by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson

Blood Work by Kim Harrison, Pedro Maia and Gemma Magno

Brightest Day by Geoff Johns, et al.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight, Vol. 8: Last Gleaming by Joss Whedon, Scott Allie, and Georges Jeanty

Captain America: Man Out of Time by Mark Waid and Jorge Molina

Captain Swing, Vol. 1 by Warren Ellis and Raulo Caceres

Casanova, Vol. 1: Luxuria by Matt Fraction and Gabriel Bá

Chew, Vol. 4: Flambe by John Layman and Rob Guillory

The Clockwork Girl by Sean O’Reilly

Cowboys and Aliens by Scott Mitchell Rosenberg

The Dark-Hunters, Vol. 4 by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Daybreak by Brian Ralph

Daytripper by Gabriel Bá and Fábio Moon

Deadpool MAX : Involuntary Armageddon by David Lapham, Kyle Baker, and Shawn Crystal

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Vol. 6 by Philip K. Dick and Tony Parker

Echo, Vol. 6: The Last Day by Terry Moore

Fables, Vol. 16: Super Team by Bill Willingham and Mark Buckingham

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Fantastic Four, Vol. 4 by Jonathan Hickman, Steve Epting, Nick Dragotta, and Mark Brooks

5 Ronin by Peter Milligan, et al.

Flashpoint by Geoff Johns and Andy Kubert

Flight of Angels by Rebecca Guay

Freeway by Mark Kalesniko

Fullmetal Alchemist, Vol. 27 by Hiromu Arakawa

George R. R. Martin’s Doorways by Stefano Martino and George R. R. Martin

Green Lantern: War of the Green Lanterns by Geoff Johns, et al.

Green Woman by Peter Straub, Michael Easton, and John Bolton

The Griff: A Graphic Novel by Christopher Moore and Ian Corson

The Gunslinger – The Battle of Tull by Stephen King, Peter David, and Michael Lark

The Gunslinger – The Little Sisters of Eluria by Stephen King, Peter David, Robin Furth, Luke Ross, and Richard Isanove

Habibi by Craig Thompson

Harbor Moon by Ryan Colucci, Dikran Ornekian, and Pawel Sambor

Hellboy: House of the Living Dead by Mike Mignola and Richard Corben

I Will Bite You! by Joseph Lambert

Irredeemable, Vol. 7 by Mark Waid and Peter Krause

iZombie, Vol. 2: uVampire by Chris Roberson and Michael Allred

Jericho Season 3 by Alejandro F. Giraldo

Jim Butcher’s Dresden Files: Fool Moon by Chase Conley, Jim Butcher, and Mark Powers

Joe the Barbarian, by Grant Morrison and Sean Murphy

Kill Shakespeare, Vol. 2 by Conor McCreery, Anthony Del Col, and Andy Belanger

The Last Dragon by Jane Yolen and Rebecca Guay

Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodriguez

Mangaman by Barry Lyga and Colleen Doran

Marineman: A Matter of Life & Depth by Ian Churchill

Naoki Urasawa’s 20th Century Boys, Vol. 18 by Naoki Urasawa

Philip K. Dick’s Electric Ant by Philip K. Dick, David Mack, and Pascal Alixe

Phoenix Without Ashes by Harlan Ellison and Alan Robinson

Pinocchio by Winshluss

RASL: Romance at the Speed of Light by Jeff Smith

Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes adapted by Ron Wimberly

7 Billion Needles, Vol. 4 by Nobuaki Tadano

Super Dinosaur, Vol. 1 by Robert Kirkman

Superboy, Vol. 1: Smallville Attacks by Jeff Lemire, Pier Gallo, and Marco Rudy

Superman: Secret Origin by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank

True Blood, Vol. 2: Tainted Love by Joe Corroney

Twilight: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 2 by Stephenie Meyer and Young Kim

Uncanny X-Force: The Dark Angel Saga, Book 1 by Rick Remender, Jerome Opena, Billy Tan, and Mark Brooks

The Unwritten, Vol. 4: Leviathan by Mike Carey and Peter Gross

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Vampire Academy by Leigh Dragoon and Emma Vieceli

The Walking Dead, Vol. 14, No Way Out by Robert Kirkman

The Walking Dead, Vol. 15, We Find Ourselves by Robert Kirkman

Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris, Vol. 1: The Colossus of Mars by Arvid Nelson and Carlos Rafael

Wonder Struck by Brian Selznick

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young

Xombi by John Rozum and Fraser Irving

For Your Consideration: Hugo Award Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

The deadline for nominating works for the Hugo Awards is March 11, 2012. Members (as of January 31, 2012) of Renovation, Chicon 7, or LoneStarCon 3 are eligible to nominate. For the Dramatic Presentation, Long Form category, I have compiled a list of productions that could be considered.

A number of people are recommending Hugo be nominated. Hugo is by far my favorite film of 2011, but I just don’t see how people can consider it a fantasy. It’s got an automaton as a plot point, but that’s based on a real invention. I suppose Hugo could be considered an alternate history, but that seems to be stretching the definition too much.

A multi-part production such as Game of Thrones or Torchwood: Miracle Day can be nominated in the Long Form category if nominators feel that the mini-series should be taken as a whole, rather than as individual episodes. The dividing line between Short Form and Long Form is 90 minutes running time, but may be adjusted slightly one way or another if a majority of nominators place a borderline work in the other category.

My expectation is that Game of Thrones will be nominated no matter what, so I will use my nominations for other works. I will surely nominate Rango, and most likely Arthur Christmas, Puss in Boots, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and X-Men: First Class will make up my other choices. The Adventures of Tintin and Source Code would also be worthy, in my opinion.

For your consideration:

The Adjustment Bureau

The Adventures of Tintin  [Annie Award nominee]

Another Earth

Arthur Christmas [Annie Award nominee]

Captain America: The First Avenger

Cars 2 [Annie Award nominee]

Cowboys & Aliens

The Divide

Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos

Game of Thrones, Season 1 [Emmy Award nominee]

Gnomeo & Juliet

Green Lantern

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

In Time

Kung Fu Panda 2  [Annie Award and Academy Award nominee]

Limitless

Melancholia

Midnight in Paris [Academy Award nominee]

Paul

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

Puss in Boots  [Annie Award and Academy Award nominee]

Rango [Annie Award winner and Academy Award nominee]

Real Steel

Rio  [Annie Award nominee]

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

Source Code

Super 8

The Thing

Thor

Torchwood: Miracle Day

Transformers: Dark of the Moon

Winnie the Pooh

X-Men: First Class

The New 52: Summary

My overall rating for the New 52: 4 of 5 stars

I think DC’s relaunch was largely successful. Their sales numbers certainly reflect a large influx of new readers, with Month 3 of the reboot still beating Marvel’s sales numbers. I haven’t read individual monthly comics in many years and I was enticed to try all 52 titles. I don’t see myself reading any of them consistently on an ongoing basis—it took me 6-7 weeks to read 52 issues, about 1200 pages, and I don’t have that kind of time to read comics on a regular basis—but I can easily see getting several of these when the trade compilations come out. Moreover, modern comic book writing relies heavily on long story arcs that are often best read in chunks.

I applaud DC for realizing that comic books are a medium, not a genre. Although heavily dominated by superheroes, this new line-up includes supernatural, horror, mystery, science fiction, western, and war stories. I hope that these find eager audiences willing to take a chance on something different.

There were a surprising number of variations on covert paramilitary operations. Men of War, Blackhawks, Suicide Squad, Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E., Stormwatch, and perhaps to a lesser extent Birds of Prey, Red Hood and the Outlaws, Justice League Dark, and maybe even one or two others, were formatted almost identically except for the milieu they were in. After a while it became hard to differentiate them all.

It is obvious that DC is catering to an older audience, with lots of gore and sexual titillation throughout the line, not to mention the $2.99 cover price precluding unemployed kids from buying too many. DC is also trying to have their cake and eat it, too, by relying heavily on established continuity to assuage the wrath of long-time fans, yet claiming to be wiping the slate clean for brand new readers. I would rather have 52 really well told stories, even if it means setting aside years of continuity, than try to artificially shoehorn often-contradictory backstories into every title.

DC is also to be lauded for including so many female characters in lead roles. I don’t think Marvel has any solo-character books starring females. DC has Batgirl, Batwoman, Birds of Prey, Catwoman, (half of) Hawk and Dove, Supergirl, Voodoo, and Wonder Woman. Now, let’s see more female writers and artists to create these stories!

Some people have complained about the perceived sexism in titles like Catwoman and Red Hood and the Outlaws, and there is certainly a strong case to be made for those criticisms. (Yet, at the same time, there was little or no outcry towards something like I, Vampire’s nearly naked cover art.) What I found most troublesome about some of these titles was the incomprehensible storytelling. These, and many of the other 52, seemed more like Issues #12, or even #50, than #1.

I had fun with the “Where’s Waldo?” hunt for the mysterious hooded figure from Flashpoint #5. There were a few books that took me several tries to find her. Did anyone else note her freakishly long fingers in her appearance in Resurrection Man?

I thought most of the books were good to very good. What were my favorites? All Star Western, Animal Man, Batwoman, Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E., Justice League, Mister Terrific, and Superboy, with guilty pleasures Captain Atom and Red Lanterns. A number of others have the potential to become favorites, depending on how well they continue—for example, Action Comics, Batman, Batman and Robin, Demon Knights, and Wonder Woman. I suspect there will be other breakout hits as they settle into their strides—and certainly some of what looks good initially will falter along the way.

There were some real duds, though: Aquaman, Green ArrowRed Hood and the Outlaws, and The Savage Hawkman, coming to mind. But I wouldn’t count these out, either, as time may show improvement.

I’m sure we can expect to see a mega-crossover event next summer as sales begin to flag, to recharge interest, reveal the hooded figure’s identity and purpose, and make some final calibrations on the characters in the new DC universe.

I look forward to enjoying many more tales from the creative folks at DC.

Green Lantern: The Animated Series

Green Lantern: The Animated Series
“Beware My Power”
Written by Jim Krieg and Ernie Altbacker; directed by Sam Liu and Rick Morales

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

The Cartoon Network’s new Green Lantern series got off to a solid, if unspectacular, start. The series title evokes comparisons to the classic Batman: The Animated Series, but doesn’t quite (yet) live up to those expectations. As the first CGI-animated series based on a DC property, the producers have a lot on the line. Not to mention having to overcome the subpar box office and critical reception of this summer’s live-action Green Lantern.

The animated series goes in a different direction than the feature film, essentially becoming a Hal Jordan (Josh Keaton)/ Kilowog (Kevin Michael Richardson) buddy-cop comedy-drama sans Sinestro and other baggage. The primary villains are the Red Lanterns led by Atrocitus (Jonathan Adams), doing his best Megabyte impersonation (from another landmark CGI series, ReBoot). This is a bit of a risk since the Red Lanterns are a very recent addition to the DC Universe, and they are portrayed very violently in the comics. Some of that violence actually spills into the series, as the first scene depicts an execution (off camera, to be sure, but there is no question about what happened) of a Green Lantern at the hands of Red Lantern Zilius Zox (Tom Kenny), and it’s not hidden by euphemisms—words like “kill” and “die” are heard throughout the episode. Nevertheless, the violence is nothing compared to the gore in the comics, and it’s nice to see something that’s not just for little kids (I’m looking at you, Batman: The Brave and the Bold).

Another plus is that the episode doesn’t repeat Green Lantern’s origin, rather jumping directly into the action without a ton of exposition. It also sets up some interesting mysteries, such as why the Guardians kept the Red Lanterns and the Frontier Green Lanterns secret.

On the down side, the episode is filled with a lot of clichés, such as a train headed towards an earthquake-damaged bridge, spaceship chases through asteroids, and an interstellar spaceship stranded with no way home. The CGI is very stylistic and there is very little texture detail, making some of the characters look like Macy’s balloons.

Whether Green Lantern: The Animated Series lives up to the legacy of Batman: The Animated Series remains to be seen, but it certainly has the potential to be a breakthrough series with Bruce Timm serving as executive producer. I will be tuning in next year when the series resumes.

The New 52: Green Lanterns

Today, I’ll take a look at the “Green Lantern” group of DC’s New 52.

Green Lantern

Geoff Johns takes up where he left off before the New-52 reboot. Sinestro is reinstated as a Green Lantern and Hal Jordan has been discharged from the Corps. We know this won’t last long, but how it will change is unclear. The artwork by Doug Mahnke and Christian Alamy is quite serviceable. Johns is used to writing very long story arcs, and the first issue is mostly just a brief set up for what’s to come, so a new reader should be able to jump in.

Red Lanterns

Despite the over-the-top premise of a group of rage-filled monsters somehow being instruments of vengeance for the oppressed of the universe, this is a surprisingly interesting book. Writer Peter Milligan seems to have his tongue firmly in cheek as he chronicles the carnage of Atrocitus and his motley band of blood-spewing berserkers. It’s hard to tell if Milligan can keep this relentless bloodshed appealing, but it should be fun finding out. The art by Ed Benes and Rob Hunter is as dark and savage as the writing. These anti-heroes could be a hit if they don’t devolve into self-parody.

Green Lantern Corps

Second-tier Green Lanterns Guy Gardner and John Stewart get bored by their day jobs (or lack thereof), so they assemble a team of like-minded Lanterns with whom to go adventuring. Writer Peter J. Tomasi and artists Fernando Pasarin and Scott Hanna are crafting what looks to be a fairly standard team-up book that should be able to spotlight some of the lesser-known Lanterns. Not much really happens in the first issue, so it’s hard to tell which direction this title will take.

Green Lantern: New Guardians

This book left me confused more than anything else. Most of the first issue is spent on retelling Green Lantern Kyle Rayner’s origin, but it’s unclear whether this occurs in the past or present. Then a bunch of multi-colored Lanterns begin losing their rings that somehow end up in Rayner’s possession. Writer Tony Bedard apparently assumes the reader has been following the saga of the differently colored Lanterns and knows what’s going on, but new readers will be left scratching their heads. Artists Tyler Kirkham and Batt take this mishmash and actually make it look much better than it has a right to be. Unless you’re a Green Lantern completist, this title doesn’t look promising.

Comikaze

Comikaze is a new comic-centric convention in Los Angeles. It appears to be making a bid to eventually replicate the multi-media San Diego Comic-Con experience, with something for fans of anime, movies, TV, and gaming. Comikaze was held at the Los Angeles Convention Center on November 5-6, 2011. I attended on Saturday only.

I went in not expecting much. A similarly publicized convention in Pasadena a couple of years ago was a dismal failure. I had purchased tickets through Goldstar, a popular discount ticket broker. The tickets were “free” for a $4.50 handling fee, so I didn’t have much to lose by going.

Fez-o-Rama Booth

The Comikaze web site indicated the dealers’ room would open at 10:00 a.m., but when I arrived shortly before 10 I discovered that the floor was not going to open until 10:30. So I had to wait a bit, which was ok. I had to redeem my Goldstar receipt for a wristband, and that took a few minutes. To give Comikaze credit, they had workers in the crowd giving out wristbands to full-paying preregistrants, enabling people like me to get to the registration table relatively quickly.

Girls and Corpses Magazine Booth

At 10:30 the door opened. Yes, door, singular. The long line slowly snaked in, single file. The cavernous hall was already bustling when I managed to get in. There were a lot of vendors selling a wide variety of products. There were also many tables for artists and celebrities. A large area at the back of the hall

Gaming Area

was reserved for gaming tournaments, so there seemed to be something for everyone. In an unusual setup, there were five panel rooms created by curtaining off sections of the hall.

Having looked at the online schedule ahead of time I knew there was to be a screening of the trailer for Daniel Radcliffe’s new horror movie, The Woman in Black, at 11:00, but none of the panel rooms had it listed on the cards in front of the room entrances. Because there was no overall printed schedule or facilities map, or signs of any sort, I ended up having to ask about four or five people where the screening was

Even the Muppets were there!

before I eventually found it in a meeting room on the third floor of the convention center. I was late, but it didn’t matter since they were still struggling to get the audio-visual equipment working. I waiting until about 11:35 when they announced it would be another 20 minutes to get ready. This was not an auspicious start to the convention!

Performance art?

I spent the next hour and a half walking the dealers’ room, by the end of which I had pretty much seen everything. There were a number of interesting vendors, including a lot of comics, toy, video, and clothing and jewelry dealers.

There were quite a few celebrities in attendance, most charging for their photos and autographs. Stan Lee and his entourage strolled through at one point. Wax figure Morgan Fairchild held court while her handler shielded her from any unauthorized (unpaid) photographs.

Not Ernest Borgnine

Oscar winner Ernest Borgnine apparently didn’t have anything better to do, but looked in amazing shape for a man of 94, certainly better than 85-year-old Richard Anderson (The Six Million Dollar Man), who sat looking wrinkled, sad, and lonely. Other famous and not-so-famous stars that I recognized included Butch Patrick (The Munsters), Richard Hatch (Battlestar Galactica), Alaina Huffman (Stargate Universe), Robert Picardo (Star Trek: Voyager),

A melange of costumes

Marina Sirtis (Star Trek: The Next Generation), and Carel Struycken (The Addams Family). There were many more that I didn’t recognize.

There were lots of costumed attendees. Just like at SDCC, they regularly blocked the aisles posing for photos. It’s just something a congoer gets used to.

Batman Panel

I attended four panels in the afternoon. At 1:00 it was “The World of Batman” with writers Gregg Hurwitz (Penguin: Pain and Prejudice) and Kyle Higgins (Batman: Gates of Gotham). They had a good discussion of what makes Batman Batman. Unfortunately, there was a very noisy cast reunion of Nickelodeon’s All That in the next room which tended to drown out what Hurwitz and Higgins said, not to mention that the acoustics to begin with were poor due to the room being a curtained off area in the giant, echoing cement hall.

Titmouse Animation Panel

At 3:00 I trekked back up to the third-floor meeting room for the Titmouse Animation Showcase. Titmouse produces Metalocalypse and other Adult Swim programs. They have taken over production of The Venture Bros., and series creator Jackson Publick was part of the panel. They also previewed Black Dynamite, a new series set to début next summer.

Back down to the hall for a panel at 4:00 called “From Robots to Monsters: Japan is the Original King.”  Moderator Jessica Tseang (ComiCast) did an excellent job of interviewing Tom Franck (North America’s largest Japanese robot collector) and Mike Costa (Transformers).

DC Panel

The final panel I attended, at 5:00, was “DC Comics New 52 Q&A” with a full table of DC writers and artists, including J. T. Krul (Captain Atom), Eric Wallace (Mr. Terrific), Phillip Tan (The Savage Hawkman), Scott Lobdell (Red Hood and the Outlaws), Brian Buccetello (The Flash), Kyle Higgins (Nightwing), Gregg Hurwitz (Penguin: Pain and Prejudice), Mike Costa (Blackhawks), and two or three others I don’t remember offhand. They all seemed genuinely excited about DC’s recent reboot and promised great things to come.

Overall, I was very pleasantly surprised by the size and quality of Comikaze. Considering that Comikaze was just one week after the Long Beach Comic-Con, the attendance was remarkably high. The organizers have shown that a successful large media convention can be held in Los Angeles. There were some things that need to be improved for next time. Not everyone has a smart phone, so they need to have better schedules and maps available for attendees (and the schedule needs to be cross-referenced by participants). Crowd control was generally pretty good, but flow into and out of the hall and the rooms were sometimes a problem. They definitely need to hold panels in the upstairs meeting rooms and not the makeshift curtained rooms. The L.A. Convention Center is not as well situated as the San Diego Convention Center, i.e., there are not nearly as many nearby hotels and restaurants. For Comikaze to grow to SDCC size, they will have to overcome those limitations, but it should be eventually possible.

For another look at Comikaze, check out this long and detailed report from The Fangirl Files.

The New 52: Justice League International and Mister Terrific

Today, I’ll look at two more titles in the New-52 “Justice League” group.

Justice League International

So we go from Justice League #1, five years in the past when superheroes are mistrusted and hunted down, to Justice League International #1 in the present where the United Nations trusts superheroes so much that they want to form their own international team. A bit confusing, but once the initial disorientation goes away, we are left with a reasonable story. Writer Dan Jurgens and artists Aaron Lopresti and Matt Ryan provide a serviceable introduction to some of the lesser-known superheroes that will make up the team. The improbable Booster Gold is chosen to lead the group, more for his willingness to be controlled by the U.N. handlers than for his powers or leadership abilities. In previous incarnations Booster Gold was mainly present for comic relief, but here it looks like things will be played more seriously. The team line-up includes Green Lantern Guy Gardner, Vixen (from the fictional African nation of Zambesi), Fire (from Brazil), and Ice (from Norway)—all long-time Justice League members before the reboot—along with Rocket Red (from Russia) and August General in Iron (from China).

JLI’s first mission is to travel to Peru to find a missing research team. With Batman as a surprise stowaway, they quickly find some strange goings-on. But will Booster be able to get the diverse members to work together before they are all killed?

This looks to be a straightforward superhero book with a group of C-level heroes. I expect it will be a competent and mildly entertaining experience, but I don’t expect anything earth shattering. The artwork is solid and nicely meshes with the writing. This is the kind of inoffensive comic that you won’t mind your teenagers reading.

Mister Terrific

Mr. Terrific, as a character, has been around since the Golden Age of comics in the 1940s. Then he wore a green and red costume with “Fair Play” written across his midsection. A new, edgier, Mr. Terrific was created in the late 1990s. This time he had “Fair Play” written on the sleeves of his leather jacket. This version saw action in the Justice Society of America series of the 2000s and in various other guest appearances. Now he’s in a solo title, perhaps even edgier, with “Fair Play” tattooed on his biceps.

Michael Holt with an Olympic gold medal, “more degrees than half the faculties of Harvard and Yale combined,” and a net worth of over a billion dollars, seemed to have it made. Then an accident killed his wife, sending him into a deep depression. On the verge of suicide, an apparition of a son he never had admonishes him to not give up his life or his research. Now, armed with technology only the third-smartest man in the world could create, Mr. Terrific performs super science by day, and saves the world by night.

Writer Eric Wallace and artists Gianluca Gugliotta and Wayne Faucher have reinvigorated a somewhat lackluster character. Maybe it’s the scientist in me that loves the unapologetic promotion of science as a tool to solve the world’s ills, but I loved the way Mr. Terrific combined brains and brawn to succeed. Michael Holt is a wonderful lead character with the right combination of angst and can-do attitude. I can see this book going in a number of directions—from straight-up adventure, to science fiction, to a bit of romance—to keep the stories fresh and unpredictable. It’s also nice to see one of the few minority characters in the DC Universe get this kind of starring role. Mr. Terrific is my favorite in the New-52 “Justice League” group.