Tag Archives: Disney

For Your Consideration: Hugo Award Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

The deadline for nominating works for the Hugo Awards is March 10, 2013. Members (as of January 31, 2013) of Chicon 7, LoneStarCon 3, or Loncon 3 are eligible to nominate.

The dividing line between Dramatic Presentation, Short Form and Dramatic Presentation, Long Form is 90 minutes running time, but may be adjusted slightly one way or another if a majority of nominators place a borderline work in the other category. A multi-part production can be nominated in the Long Form category.

There is an overwhelming chance that Game of Thrones, Season 2 will be nominated, just as Season 1 was last year (my advice is to not waste your nomination votes for individual episodes of Game of Thrones in the Short Form category, as they will be disqualified). Beyond that, it seems to me that the field is pretty much wide open. I think The Avengers, Looper, The Hunger Games, The Cabin in the Woods, and The Hobbit are the most likely to be nominated. But there are a number of other worthy works.

For your consideration:

  • The Amazing Spider-Man, Sony Pictures
  • Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fox Searchlight Picturesbrave
  • Brave, Pixar Animation Studios
  • The Cabin in the Woods, Lionsgate
  • Chronicle, Twentieth Century Fox
  • Cloud Atlas, Warner Bros. Pictures
  • The Dark Knight Rises, Warner Bros. Picturesfrankenweenie-poster
  • Frankenweenie, Walt Disney Studios
  • Game of Thrones, Season 2, HBO
  • The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, New Line Cinema
  • Hotel Transylvania, Sony Pictures Animation
  • The Hunger Games, Lionsgateiron_sky
  • Iron Sky, Entertainment One
  • John Carter, Walt Disney Pictures
  • Life of Pi, Twentieth Century Foxlooper
  • Looper, TriStar Pictures
  • Marvel’s The Avengers, Marvel Studios
  • Men in Black 3, Columbia Pictures
  • ParaNorman, LAIKA/Focus Features
  • The Pirates! Band of Misfits, Aardman Animations and Sony Pictures Animation
  • Prometheus, Twentieth Century Fox
  • The Rabbi’s Cat, GKIDS
  • Rise of the Guardians, DreamWorks Animationrobotandfrank
  • Robot & Frank, Samuel Goldwyn Films
  • Ruby Sparks, Fox Searchlight Pictures
  • Safety Not Guaranteed, FilmDistrict
  • The Secret World of Arrietty, Studio Ghibli
  • Seeking a Friend for the End of the World, Focus Features
  • Skyfall, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)
  • Snow White and the Huntsman, Universal Pictures
  • Ted, Universal Pictures
  • The Woman in Black, CBS Films
  • Wreck-It Ralph, Walt Disney Animation Studios

For Your Consideration: Hugo Award Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

The deadline for nominating works for the Hugo Awards is March 10, 2013. Members (as of January 31, 2013) of Chicon 7, LoneStarCon 3, or Loncon 3 are eligible to nominate.

It’s pretty much a given that at least three episodes of Doctor Who will be nominated, and that one of those will win. While Doctor Who is certainly an outstanding series, there are a multitude of other science fiction and fantasy TV shows, as well as a few theatrical shorts and Internet productions that are worthy of consideration.

A multi-part production such as Game of Thrones, Season 2 will undoubtedly be nominated in the Long Form category as Season 1 was last year. So my advice is to not waste your nomination votes in the Short Form category for individual episodes, as they will be disqualified.

For the Dramatic Presentation, Short Form category, I have compiled a list of productions that are eligible to be nominated this year. It is a long list, and undoubtedly not comprehensive. I’ve listed the titles of individual episodes because the Hugo rules require individual episodes to be nominated. The dividing line between Short Form and Long Form is 90 minutes running time, but may be adjusted slightly one way or another if a majority of nominators place a borderline work in the other category.

For your consideration:jakethedog

  • “Jake the Dog”, Adventure Time
  • “Prehistoric Peril!”, The Adventures of the League of S.T.E.A.M.
  • “Tommy Madsen”, Alcatraz
  • “God’s Eye”, Alphas
  • “I Am Anne Frank”, Parts 1 and 2, American Horror Story: AsylumArcher Space Race
  • “Space Race”, Parts 1 and 2, Archer
  • “Betrayal”, Arrow
  • “Secret Invasion”, The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest HeroesAWAKE
  • “Say Hello to My Little Friend”, Awake
  • “Blood & Chrome”, Battlestar Galactica
  • “Bridesmaid Up!”, Beauty and the Beast
  • “Trust”, Before Orel
  • “The War Child”, Being Human
  • “The Ultimate Enemy”, Parts 1 and 2, Ben 10: Ultimate Alien
  • “Time Slime”, Bravest Warriors
  • “The Final Frontier”, Castle
  • “Digital Estate Planning”, Community
  • “End Times”, Continuumdarkknightreturnspart1
  • Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, Part 1, DC Entertainment
  • Justice League: Doom, DC Entertainment
  • Superman vs. The Elite, DC Entertainment
  • “The Angels Take Manhattan”, Doctor Who
  • “When Lightning Strikes”, Dragons: Riders of Berk
  • “Just Another Day”, Eureka
  • “A More Perfect Union”, Falling Skies
  • “Yug Ylimaf”, Family GuyFringe
  • “Letters of Transit”, Fringe
  • “The Bots and the Bees”, Futurama
  • Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare”, Gracie Films
  • “Homecoming”, Green Lantern: The Animated Series
  • “Season of the Hexenbiest”, Grimm
  • “Thanks for the Memories”, HavenIron-Man
  • “Control-Alt-Delete”, Iron Man: Armored Adventures
  • “Cinderella Liberty”, Last Resort
  • “Endgame”, The Legend of Korra
  • “Midnight Lamp”, Lost Girlmerlin
  • “The Diamond of the Day”, Parts 1 and 2, Merlin
  • Episode #4.3, Misfits
  • Head over Heels, National Film and Television School (NFTS)
  • Mockingbird Lane, NBC
  • “Queen of Hearts”, Once Upon a Time
  • “The Contingency”, Person of Interestreddwarf
  • “Trojan”, Red Dwarf
  • “Nobody’s Fault But Mine”, Revolution
  • “DC Comics Special”, Robot Chicken
  • “Bill Plympton Couch Gag”, The Simpsons
  • “Wrath of the Gods”, Spartacus: War of the Damned
  • “Revenge”, Star Wars: The Clone Wars
  • “Citizen Fang”, Supernatural
  • “Fury”, Teen Wolf
  • “Birth of the Blades”, Thundercats
  • “Pilot”, Touch
  • “Darkest Hour”, Transformers Prime
  • “Scars”, Parts 1 and 2, TRON: Uprising
  • “Save Yourself”, True Blood
  • “Freaky”, Ultimate Spider-Man
  • “The Departed”, The Vampire Diaries
  • “A Very Venture Halloween”, The Venture Bros.
  • “Parting Shots”, The Walking DeadPaperman
  • Paperman, Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • “The Ones You Love”, Warehouse 13
  • “Depths”, Young Justice

Frankenweenie – Official Trailer

Here’s first official trailer for Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie, coming in October (when else?).

The Upcoming Year in Movies

2012 looks to be an amazing year for science fiction and animated movies. What will be the hits? Here are some of my predictions, but I’m sure there will be plenty of surprises in store.

January

Fullmetal Alchemist : The Sacred Star of Milos – This feature-length sequel to the hit anime series looks like it will take place somewhere in the middle of the Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood storyline. The release is limited, but hopefully it will come to a theater near you. Click here for U.S. theater/Canadian theater listings in your area.

February

Chronicle – The movie dead zone of February starts with this story of high school students who gain superpowers. Go watch reruns of Heroes instead.

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island – The February movie wasteland continues with an inane adaptation that would make Jules Verne weep.

Star Wars Episode I — The Phantom Menace 3-D – will George Lucas ever stop tinkering with his movies? And nothing could add dimension to the flat characters of Episode I.

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance – a sequel nobody but Nicolas Cage demanded.

The Secret World of Arrietty – from Studio Ghibli, an adaptation co-written by Hayao Miyazaki (but, alas, not directed by him) of The Borrowers by Mary Norton. The trailer looks great; let’s hope the movie is, too.

Dr. Suess’ The Lorax – finally, an animated adaptation of a Dr. Seuss book that looks like it will be true to its source and actually be funny.

March

John Carter – a live action adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Mars series by writer/director Andrew Stanton (WALL·E, Finding Nemo) starring a bunch of unknowns. With a screenplay co-written by Michael Chabon, I have high hopes that Stanton will bring his animation magic to this project, just as Brad Bird did with 2011’s Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol.

Mirror Mirror – the first of two retellings of the Snow White fairy tale, this one staring Julia Roberts and Sean Bean.

The Hunger Games – will this be a juggernaut franchise like Harry Potter or a flop like The Golden Compass? A lot is riding on this film, and all signs point to it coming through.

The Pirates! Band of Misfits – Peter Lord (Chicken Run) of Aardman Animations seemingly can do no wrong, and the trailer is hilarious. I have high expectations for this animated film.

Wrath of the Titans – Another underwhelming special-effects laden quest of Perseus doing the gods’ bidding.

April

Iron Sky – You had me at “Nazi lunar base.” This indie will premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival in April. Let’s hope it makes it to the U.S. soon thereafter.

Extracted – Sasha Roiz (Caprica, Warehouse 13, Grimm) stars as a brilliant engineer who invents a device that enables him to enter another’s mind. While testing it on a convict, he gets trapped and must race the clock to find a way out. Debuting at the Austin South by Southwest Festival, this indie could be one to watch for.

May

The Avengers – Joss Whedon’s take on the iconic Marvel team is the dream movie for comic book fans. I’m not a big fan of Whedon, and my concern is that he won’t be able to corral the egos of his large cast of stars, and the film will veer off into incomprehensibility. Nevertheless, this movie should deliver blockbuster numbers, no matter how good or bad it is.

Dark Shadows – Tim Burton and Johnny Depp team up once again to revive the 1960’s soap opera about Barnabas Collins and his wacky household of vampires and ghouls. I expect campy fun.

Men in Black 3 – another sequel nobody clamored for, but Will Smith will put butts in seats.

Dorothy of OZ – I saw a preview of this animated musical at San Diego Comic-Con last year, and it looked HORR! I! BLE! Why or why can’t someone just make a successful, straight adaptation of the marvelous source material?

Battleship – very loosely based on the popular board game (coming soon: Candy Land, I kid you not), the trailer is just a mess and a half—lots of explosions and women in bikinis. And it will make a ton of money.

June

Snow White and the Huntsman – the second Snow White adaptation; this one a bit edgier than the first.

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted – I have to admit that the first two in the series were lighthearted fun, and I don’t expect them to deviate from the formula.

Prometheus – Ridley Scott’s triumphant return to science fiction as co-written by Lost’s Damon Lindelof, this will either be astounding or a big, fat mess. No one seems to know whether this is a prequel to Alien or whether it morphed into something else during filming, but the trailer definitely makes me want to see it.

Jack the Giant Killer – another fairy tale retold, this time “Jack and the Beanstalk” as directed by Bryan Singer.

Brave – Pixar’s big release of 2012, their first starring a female protagonist. The trailer looks amazing, and I expect this will be the animated feature to beat at next year’s Oscars.

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter – cheesy fun from producer Tim Burton.

G.I. Joe: Retaliation – stars Bruce Willis and Dwayne Johnson should ensure this will be better than the first G.I. Joe movie, but director Jon M. Chu’s background is from the music and dance world (most notably, the Step Up franchise), so it’s hard to imagine it will be much better.

July

The Amazing Spider-Man – July will be the battle of the titans: Spider-Man vs. Batman. This reboot of Spider-Man will hopefully reinvigorate the franchise, but I think it will be overshadowed by…

The Dark Knight Rises – Christopher Nolan’s final entry into the dark world of Batman. Will Nolan be able to pull off a tour de force without a force of nature like Heath Ledger? Most likely it will be an emphatic “yes.” Here is a clever mash-up trailer for the film using footage from Batman: The Animated Series:

Ice Age: Continental Drift – at least we get to laugh at Scrat try to rescue his acorn, regardless of the other dreck that may be in the movie.

August

Total Recall – this new Total Recall will supposedly stick close to the original Philip K. Dick short story “We Can Remember It For You Wholesale” it’s based on.

ParaNorman – this animated fantasy/horror/comedy from the makers of Coraline could be a sleeper hit.

September

Hotel Transylvania – Director Genndy Tartakovsky (The Powerpuff Girls, Samurai Jack) animates Adam Sandler as Dracula in this Sony Pictures Animation presentation.

Dredd – Karl Urban stars in a new take on the ultra-violent British comic book. Without Sylvester Stallone to muck it up, it might actually turn out ok. Lena Headey co-stars.

October

Frankenweenie – Tim Burton’s feature-length stop-motion remake of his infamous 1984 short. Will audiences flock to see a black-and-white animated film in 2012? The hip ones will.

November

Wreck-It Ralph – Disney Animation’s big film for 2012 features the voices of John C. Reilly, Jane Lynch, and Jack McBrayer in something to do with video game characters coming to life.

Rise of the Guardians – Dreamworks Animation brings together the voice talents of Hugh Jackman, Jude Law, Chris Pine, and Alec Baldwin in a story that has Santa, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, the Sandman, and Jack Frost banding together to fight the Bogeyman.

December

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey – the one every fanboy has been waiting for—Peter Jackson’s long delayed adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s beloved children’s book. My only question is whether it will remain true to its source material or whether it will be Lord of the Rings, Part 4. Either way, it should be awesome.

World War Z – based on Max Brooks’ tongue-in-cheek zombie book, this adaptation co-written by J. Michael Straczynski and staring Brad Pitt could be a surprise hit.

Unscheduled

Robot and Frank – A well-reviewed entry at the Sundance Film Festival starring Frank Langella as a burglar who teams up with a robot to commit his crimes. Co-starring James Marsden, Liv Tyler, and Susan Sarandon.

Upside Down – A man searches an alternate universe for a long-lost love from his youth. Stars Kirsten Dunst.

The Prodigies – Warner Bros. Pictures is planning to distribute this French animated superhero movie from 2011 sometime this year; my guess in limited release.

“Walt Disney’s SIN CITY” A Trailer Mash Up

I think this mash-up is a well done parody.

Disney’s Four Color Adventures Volume 1

Disney's Four-Color Adventures Volume 1Disney’s Four Color Adventures Volume 1 by Al Taliaferro

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This volume reprints, in their entireties, issues #4 (1940) and #13 (1941) of the Four Color comic series published by Dell. Four Color issues were one-shots of a diverse variety of titles. These particular issues were the first two of the Four Color comics to contain Disney characters. In fact, Four Color #4 was the first all-color Disney comic book in English.

Four-Color #4 reprinted Donald Duck daily newspaper gag strips drawn by Al Taliaferro. Taliaferro began working at the Disney Studio in 1931 as an inker for Floyd Gottfredson’s Mickey Mouse Sunday page. He started penciling and inking the Silly Symphonies Sunday strip in 1933. In 1936, he originated the first Donald Duck newspaper strip, which he drew until his death in 1969. Within that strip, he created many fan-favorite duck characters including Donald’s nephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie. The strips were primarily written by Bob Karp, with an assist by future duck legend Carl Barks.

Taliaferro’s version of Donald formed the basis of his character as a quick-tempered, immature prankster. The four-panel strips relied heavily on sight gags, often going without word balloons. The addition of Donald’s nephews created more opportunities for laughs, as now Donald became the victim of his nephew’s shenanigans. Some of the jokes don’t hold up well after seventy-odd years, but a surprising number of the strips are funnier than ever. For that reason alone, this facsimile edition is well worth reading. And, as a historical record of the early days of Taliaferro’s craftsmanship, it is a treasure for Disney duck enthusiasts like me.

Four-Color #13 was a comic adaptation of The Reluctant Dragon (1941) and related stories from the movie of the same name, complete with photos of Robert Benchley’s in-movie tour of the Disney lot. It also included a text adaptation of “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” segment from Fantasia. The art, largely copied from the movie’s animation cels, was by Irving Tripp and Jack Hannah. As a historical record of the first original Disney comic, this is interesting. However, the stories themselves don’t hold up well for modern readers. In addition, the layouts are stiff, with an odd combination of text narration and word balloons that does not flow well. Unless you are a Disney completist, I recommend skipping Four-Color #13.

BOOM! Studios has done a great job with their Disney reprints, with quality reproduction at an affordable price. Reportedly, they are discontinuing their reprint license with Disney, so there may not be any more volumes in this series. Perhaps Marvel, which is now owned by Disney, will take up where BOOM! leaves off. Taliaferro and other lesser known classic Disney artists deserve more recognition. In the meantime, Fantagraphics is continuing their wonderful hardcover collections of Gottfredson’s Mickey Mouse dailies, and they are scheduled to soon begin publishing Barks’ Uncle Scrooge comics.

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