The New 52: I, Vampire and Justice League Dark

The final two books in “The Dark” group of DC’s New 52:

I, Vampire

Aiming to cash in on the vampire craze, DC is resurrecting an obscure property from House of Mystery from thirty years ago and reimagining it as part of the mainstream DC Universe. I, Vampire is the story of Andrew Bennett’s quest to save humanity from the violent uprising of his fellow vampires, even if it means exterminating his own kind. It is also the story of the unrequited love between Bennett and Mary, Queen of Blood. Writer Joshua Hale Fialkov has created something vicious and brutal that fills a seldom seen niche in the DC Universe. It will accept occasional visits from the spandex-clad crowd, but should be a fairly self-contained horror thriller. Artist Andrea Sorrentino provides sexy, moody scenes that remind me a bit of Gene Colan’s work. With all the controversy surrounding some of the New-52 Batman titles, I haven’t heard any complaints about Sorrentino’s cover showing the nearly naked Mary, a testament to his ability to turn out something akin to fine art. I suspect this book will read better in the collected trade edition, but I am pleasantly surprised by how well it hooked me with its first issue.

Justice League Dark

Justice League Dark bridges the gap between the occult and superhero sides of the DC Universe. It brings together a mixture of DCU and Vertigo supernatural characters and throws them into a deadly battle with the evil Enchantress when the regular Justice League is defeated by her powerful magic. Zatanna, Madame Xanadu, Shade the Changing Man, John Constatine, and Deadman will defend the world from the province of spells, hocus pocus, and demons.

Writer Peter Milligan gives us a story that is dark but not grim. The action gets going right away, and although neither the character origins nor the extent of their powers are shown, it’s easy to keep up with what’s going on, with the sense that the details will be undoubtedly filled in later. Mikel Janin provides beautiful artwork that is unusually light for a supernatural title like this, and his character designs are flawless. A special mention should go to colorist Ulises Arreloa’s subtle enhancements. As with I, Vampire, I suspect this will read better as a collection, allowing the character development to move forward at a natural pace.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s